jaypore:

Stories of Partition

The Partition of British India into modern day India, Pakistan and Bangladesh marks the largest forced human migration in history. According to estimates nearly 15 million people lost their homes in 1947 and that number stands at over 20 million today. It is also estimated that between 0.5 and 2 million people lost their lives. The Partition also fundamentally changed many South Asian cultures and ways of living. Yet, unlike other major events of the last century, such as the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the Holocaust in Europe, the Partition of South Asia in 1947 has hardly been documented and understood. 

The 1947 Partition Archive is a non-profit organization that documents, preserves and shares eye witness accounts from all ethnic, religious and economic communities affected by the Partition of British India in 1947. We are proud to note that we support this initiative whole-heartedly!

Should you know anyone that has a story to tell, head here pronto -http://www.1947partitionarchive.org/share

Image courtesy giltoor

(Source: jaypore, via youarenotdesi)

kristenanna1:

This was my favorite thing ever.

A Korean movie, addressing how ridiculous Korean dramas are, recycling the same twist and sad ending- and that one guy at the end is just like NOPE, I’M DONE, and storms off.

(via korraisnottan)

koreanmodel:

Gabi Moon and Park Sungjin by Hong Janghyun for W Korea July 2014

koreanmodel:

Gabi Moon and Park Sungjin by Hong Janghyun for W Korea July 2014

Ok, this is so good. I should have posted this earlier.

quelquesmoments:

west bank, palestine / 21 august 2013
…welcome

quelquesmoments:

west bank, palestine / 21 august 2013

…welcome

ouragstories:

My mother is an American girl, even if she is born in Laos and grew up selling soda and papaya salad in the refugee camps.  America touched her life.  Her oldest brothers fiought under General Vang Pao and the Secret Guerilla Units.  Some of her brother taught English in the Ban Vinai Refugee Camp.  She knew America even before she immigrated to Manitowac, Wisconsin in December of 1979.  While she went to school in a small all-white town, her ESL teachers projected their voices to the students of Hmong descendants, as if they were deaf.  From this experience, my mother has now been serving the Milwaukee Public Schools as an English as a Second Language instructor.

My mom applied to over 30+ teaching jobs. She sought position in Wausau/Eau Claire/Madison/Sheboygan School districts, all were predominantly White. She got rejected because her employers did not want a “broken English” instructor. No matter how well she taught and that language is not one type, they declined her. She never gave up. One factor for her career was because other womyn of color in the ESL department of MPS fought for affirmative action, mom was hired. And to this day, mom shares her struggles for survival. Her face lights up when she meets her former students and their families anywhere. Her life warms up when students and their families welcome her to their celebrations. Most of her students say they would like to become teachers someday. This is why mom won’t retire even after she has retired. She’ll continue to teach and learn.
- Jackie

ouragstories:

My mother is an American girl, even if she is born in Laos and grew up selling soda and papaya salad in the refugee camps.  America touched her life.  Her oldest brothers fiought under General Vang Pao and the Secret Guerilla Units.  Some of her brother taught English in the Ban Vinai Refugee Camp.  She knew America even before she immigrated to Manitowac, Wisconsin in December of 1979.  While she went to school in a small all-white town, her ESL teachers projected their voices to the students of Hmong descendants, as if they were deaf.  From this experience, my mother has now been serving the Milwaukee Public Schools as an English as a Second Language instructor.
My mom applied to over 30+ teaching jobs. She sought position in Wausau/Eau Claire/Madison/Sheboygan School districts, all were predominantly White. She got rejected because her employers did not want a “broken English” instructor. No matter how well she taught and that language is not one type, they declined her. She never gave up. One factor for her career was because other womyn of color in the ESL department of MPS fought for affirmative action, mom was hired. And to this day, mom shares her struggles for survival. Her face lights up when she meets her former students and their families anywhere. Her life warms up when students and their families welcome her to their celebrations. Most of her students say they would like to become teachers someday. This is why mom won’t retire even after she has retired. She’ll continue to teach and learn.
- Jackie

(via fascinasians)

koreanmodel:

Kim Wonjung by Jdz Chung for W Korea July 2014

koreanmodel:

Kim Wonjung by Jdz Chung for W Korea July 2014

The world is so small these days that it’s hard to imagine being the first of your people to visit a foreign country that you’ve had no real contact with or know nothing about. But back in 1834, the idea of an Asian woman coming to America would have been akin to someone today visiting a newly discovered alien civilization on another planet. Yet, that’s what it must have felt like for Afong Moy whom history has recorded as the first Chinese (and most likely first “Oriental”) woman to set foot on U.S. soil. But the circumstances under which Moy became a pioneer was not the most pleasant one.

In 1832, American traders Nathaniel and Frederick Carne made their first trip to China. Up to that point, they had made their fortune importing items from France but realized there was an untapped market in the Orient they could exploit. Their search led them to China where they started to import fancy, but affordable Chinese goods that the growing American middle-class population could afford.

The Carne brothers were also showmen, always searching for ways to better market their business to the public. And they hit upon the ultimate marketing ploy when they decided to go one step farther and import a real live Chinese woman to America for the first time.

On October 17, 1834, the cargo ship Washington under the command of a Captain Obear sailed into New York harbor with a bevy of goods from the mysterious Orient including what the New York Daily-Advertiser described as “a beautiful Chinese lady, called Juila Foochee ching-chang king, daughter of Hong wang-tzang tzee king. As she will see all who are disposed to pay twenty five cents. She will no doubt have many admirers.”

The first Chinese woman in America was not only exotic and regal (the supposed daughter of royalty) but she would be little more than a circus attraction; no better than an animal at a zoo that people would pay money to see. The Carne brothers changed her name to the easier-to-pronounce Afong Moy and rented an exhibition hall where the public could observe this strange woman with freakishly tiny (bound) feet. Newspapers described her as 19-years-old (though her age would fluctuate in different accounts), four feet ten inches tall, dressed in her “national costume” and with feet that were only four inches in length due to having worn “iron shoes” throughout her childhood.

Moy immediately became the talk of the town with newspapers reporting most likely fabricated details such as how she had “burst into a fit of laughter” upon seeing a left-handed person since such a thing didn’t exist in China to how the sound of a gun being fired at a rally scared her so much that she ran away.

The Carne brothers decorated the exhibit hall with artifacts and other items from China. They told reporters that they wanted to display Moy in her “natural environment,” but no doubt it wasn’t a coincidence that those were the very items they were importing from China to sell and that their business increased as a result of the popularity of the exhibition.

Moy went on display on November 6, 1834 and the public could see the Chinese woman from the hours of 10 AM-2 PM or 5 PM to 9 PM. Spectators witnessed such exotic things as Moy eating with chopsticks and speaking Chinese. There was even a Q & A session where people could ask her questions through an interpreter. Every few minutes she would be ordered to walk around the room with her bound feet.

Not everyone was impressed with the exhibit and recognized its exploitative nature. The New York Mirror published a full editorial explaining why it would not cover the exhibit: “We have not been to see Miss Afong Moy, the Chinese lady with the little feet; nor do we intend to perform that universal ceremony, unless we should find the notoriety which the non-performance must occasion inconveniently burdensome… . The lovely creatures were made for anything but to be stared at, for half a dollar a head.”

Still, none of the newspapers, regardless of how sympathetic they were to her situation, bothered to interview Moy herself. I’ve searched to find more details about her life, but not much is known about who she was, her past history (the Carne brothers’ claims that she was a “Chinese princess” were most likely bogus) or even what her real name was.

How must she have felt to not only be the first Chinese woman in this strange land, but to have earned that title while being treated like a sideshow oddity? And this was also during a time when there were very few Asians in America at all, let alone women. The first big wave of Chinese immigrants didn’t arrive until the California Gold Rush and that was still 15 years in the future.

Not much more is known about her life in America either. According to records, she toured the United States between 1834-1847. The following advertisement from the July 9, 1836 issue of the New York Times suggests this appearance at Peale’s Museum would be her last:

Although much of the details of her life are lost to history, Moy’s status as a pioneer who boldly went where none like her had gone before earns her the status of Original Offender.

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(Source: medium.com)

thatcupofjo:

Friends— for the past year, I’ve been working on a project that has taught me so very much about what it means to be a filmmaker and collaborator. It’s the first project I’ve ever produced and the first I’ve ever written (and the first I’ve ever gif-ed yo). It’s far from perfect, and I still have so much to learn, but I think that I accomplished what I set out to do— that is, challenge the normative narrative by creating a place for marginalized identities in speculative fiction, a genre that has been systematically dominated by cis white men at varying degrees of scruffiness. I’d like to think we did something a little bit different.

This is THE PANTHEON PROJECT

A struggling grad student starts a vlog about her adventures moving to New York City, only to discover that her new roommates are actually the goddesses Pele and Guan Yin. With them come a not-so-ragtag band of all-powerful gods— gods who are far more human than we’d like them to be. (x)

bloodytea:

mingsonjia:

《花·女词》 by 呀呀(Yaya)

Flowers’ Symbolization in Chinese Culture 

牡丹          Tree peony             (Mǔdān;  symbolize royalty in ancient China. Now it commonly symbolizes prosperity)

梅              Plum blossom       (Méi or Méihuā;  symbolize honor, love, hope and so many others. See HERE)

杜鹃花       Rhododendron simsii    (Dùjuān Huā;  symbolize beauty, sweet love and chastity)

木兰           Magnolia liliiflora   (Mulan magnolia / Mùlán; symbolize faith, dignity and loyalty)

茉莉           Jasmine                  (Mòlì; symbolize purity, attraction and Chinese tea culture)

彼岸花       Lycoris radiata        (Red spider lily / Bǐ’àn Huā; symbolize seduction and ingratitude, “gentleness from devils”)

海棠花       Malus spectabilis   (Asiatic apple / Hǎitáng Huā; symbolize parting and nostalgia for lover or home)

I bought this book the other week in a metro mall! (Taiwan) Highly recommended to those who like Chinese culture/paintings/flowers

(via fuckyeahchinesefashion)

Rafeef Ziadah - ‘We teach life, sir’, London, 12.11.11

RAFEEF ZIADAH is a Canadian-Palestinian spoken word artist and activist. Her debut CD Hadeel is dedicated to Palestinian youth, who still fly kites in the face of F16 bombers, who still remember the names if their villages in Palestine and still hear the sound of Hadeel (cooing of doves) over Gaza.

fuckyeahethnicmen:

Habib Khan

fuckyeahethnicmen:

Habib Khan

Truth. Be. Told. f. Staceyann Chin

To fund “Truth. Be. Told.” please donate $5 or more by Saturday, August 9, 2014 at 11:59pm, PST: 
igg.me/at/truthbetold

"I knew that such experiences break people. And I always knew that I wanted to survive in a way that was healthy. I knew that I wanted to become the kind of person who would spend all my resources and all my efforts and all my energy putting myself in a way that I would be good to people so that even if I weren’t the kind of whole that I was before those experiences, I would at least become the kind of mended that would be good for others, and that would even be good for myself."

Writer Staceyann Chin explores life growing up in Jamaica, activism, and art through the lens of being a first-time mom to a busy toddler.

"Truth. Be. Told." is a documentary series that seeks to reclaim the birthright of Queer Black visionaries within our families and communities by providing a platform for out, Black LGBTQ people to tell their personal stories of challenge, radical self-inquiry, personal transformation, and triumph.

To date more than 50 people have committed to being interviewed, including: Staceyann Chin (Jamaican-born, Tony Award-winning playwright); B. Slade (Vocalist formerly known as Tonéx); Toshi Reagon (Singer/Songwriter) Emil Wilbekin (Former Editor for Essence and Vibe magazine); Darnell Moore (Writer/Activist); Patrik-Ian Polk (Creator of Logo TV’s “Noah’s Arc” series); Mia McKenzie (Creator of the Black Girl Dangerous blog); Linda Villarosa (Former Editor for the New York Times); Dr. Alexis Pauline Gumbs (Co-Creator of the Mobile Homecoming Project); Dr. Kortney Ryan Ziegler (Filmmaker/Transgender Rights Activist); Karamo Brown (Oprah Winfrey Network Host, Model and Actor); and Justin Robinson (founding member of the Grammy Award-winning Carolina Chocolate Drops).

Follow “Truth. Be. Told.” at 
facebook.com/TruthBeToldTVSeries
truthbetoldtvseries.tumblr.com/
twitter.com/TruthB3ToldTV
pinterest.com/TruthB3ToldTV
instagram.com/TruthB3ToldTV

Allie Jones

Japanese Artist Arrested for 3-D Printing Her Vagina Selfie

Japanese artist Rokudenashiko was arrested after turning her vagina selfie into a 3-D printed “pussy boat” and sending the scans to her supporters from a crowdfunding campaign. Police said that sending the scans (which could be used to 3-D print more vagina selfies) breaks Japan’s obscenity laws.

The Guardian reports that the artist, whose real name is Megumi Igarashi, could face up to two years in jail or a fine of about $24,500 if convicted. Rokudenashiko has denied the allegations and questioned why the scans are being called obscene. She explains her vagina-themed art this way: “I wanted to make pussy more casual and pop.”

In her crowdfunding campaign pitch, Rokudenashiko offered mock-ups of the boat and this explanation of why she needed a 3-D printer:

I wanted to make pussy more casual and pop. That’s how I came to make a pussy lampshade, a remote-controlled pussy car, a pussy accessary, a pussy smartphone case, and so on. … However, mold by hand has the limitation. … [It’s] not suitable for making large art pieces such as a pussy door, a pussy car, or a pussy boat. I was wondering how I can make it possible, and then I finally found that 3D scanner can make it happen easily!

Japanese Artist Arrested for 3-D Printing Her Vagina SelfieEXPAND

Rokudenashiko did make the boat, and she’s committed to continuing her art. “Pussy has been such a taboo in the Japanese society,” she writes. “Penis, on the other hand, has been used in illustrations and signed as a part of pop culture. But pussy has never been so cute.”

[Images via The Guardian, Rokudenashiko