Chinatown Sartorialist - The Bold Italic - San Francisco
Written by Valerie Luu · Photographs by Andria Lo

Chinatown fashion combines urban utilitarianism with smart, unexpected combinations of prints and a use of color that just made me feel uplifted whenever I saw it. They’re fashionistas – worthy of any street-style blog.

If you were to replace the 80-year-old senior with, say, myself, I would look so undoubtedly hip. Unfortunately, I don’t possess that same knack for fashion, but I wanted to meet these fashion-forward seniors and document their style.

This photo essay is a month’s worth of excursions with photographer Andria Lo and translators Tricia Choi, Kat Wong, and Michelle Yeung. It was a month of cold and hot tea and dim sum meals, of many seniors being open with us, sharing their outfits and telling us their stories, from the feet up.

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awkwardsituationist:

thirteen year old ashol pan is part of a nascent movement of girls who are keeping alive the six thousand year old kazakh tradition of golden eagle hunting known as berkutchy.

though long the monopoly of boys — once deemed uniquely strong enough to carry a full grown eagle on their arms and endure harsh winter hunts — fewer are now learning the skill, abandoning their traditional semi nomadic ways for life in the cities.

berkutchy is a life long profession, and is often a hereditary one. but ashol’s brother left for the military, leaving her father, an experienced eagle hunter, to ask if she would take his place and assume training.

asher svidensky — who took these photos during a four month trek in the mountains of western mongolia’s bayan ulgii (or “rich cradle”) province, where only 250 hunters remain — told the bbc that where most boys are at first apprehensive around their eagles, ashol was very much at ease.

ashol, though still in school, will spend much of her time nurturing her eagle, imprinting herself on the fiercely independent bird from birth. after much time and training, her eagle — who is considered a member of the family — will learn to track down rabbits, foxes and wolves, whose fur is needed for the harsh winters.

(via saotome-michi)

mymodernmet:

Lifestyle photographer Grace Chon recently turned the camera on her 10-month-old baby Jasper and their 7-year-old rescue dog Zoey, putting them side-by-side in the some of the most adorable portraits ever.

rezprojectresources:

Just days ago PolicyMic put up a piece entitled “National Geographic Concludes What Americans Will Look Like in 2050, and It’s Beautiful.” In it writer Zak Cheney-Rice attempts to address the so-called rise of multiracial peoples which has captured/enchanted the public eye and with which the media has become deeply enamored. He spotlights a retrospective and admiring look at National Geographic’s “The Changing Face of America” project of last year featuring a series of multiracial portraits by well-known German photographer Martin Schoeller, and also peripherally cites some statistics/graphs that demonstrate the explosion of the mixed-race population.

Changing Faces

(Image source)

“In a matter of years,” Cheney-Rice writes, “We’ll have Tindered, OKCupid-ed and otherwise sexed ourselves into one giant amalgamated mega-race.” Despite admitting racial inequity persists, he still flirts with the idea of an “end” approaching (presumably to race and by association racism), and suggests while we’re waiting for things to get better, we might “…applaud these growing rates of intermixing for what they are: An encouraging symbol of a rapidly changing America. 2050 remains decades away, but if these images are any preview, it’s definitely a year worth waiting for.” We are then perhaps left with this rather unfortunate centerpiece of his statement, “Here’s how the ‘average American’ will look by the year 2050”:

Portrait

Not surprisingly, the Net erupted in controversy/debate; some standing by and championing the purported beauty of race-mixing as hope for a post-race future; many others pointing out the absurdity of a multiracial=postracial equation, angrily accusing the article of privileging light-skinned mixes thereby centering whiteness and upholding an age-old white dominant race hierarchy. NPR blogger Gene Demby @GeeDee215 tweeted, “Dunno what to do with the fact that the idea we’ll screw racism out of existence is considered a serious position.” A day later Jia Tolentino wrote a rebuttal on the hairpin in which she calls the piece “dumb,” “shallow,” “shortcut-minded,” and charges it with appearing “researched and progressive while actually eliding all of the underlying structural concerns that will always influence what race (and attendant opportunity) means in America far more than the distracting visual pleasure of a girl that looks like Rashida Jones.” She too also unfortunately comes to rest again on this particular portrait, “Look at this freckled, green-eyed future. Look at how beautiful it is to see everything diluted that we used to hate”:

I have been thinking a lot about this face which, thanks to National Geographic and PolicyMic, is now flying around the World Wide Web and has become the stage for much heated race-arguing. What is particularly striking to me, and what I have written on before, is that this person is an actual living, breathing human being — but she is not being treated as such. She is being wielded as a tool, a device, maybe even a weapon? Her physical body is used as a site for others to play out their racial theorizing while her own voice and story remain conspicuously absent.

What I think is incredibly important here (and doesn’t seem to have come up in the ensuing disputes) is why portraits designed to quantify/quality racialized appearance were taken with such intent in the first place? Photography which captures a person’s image for the sole and express purpose of measuring then discussing their supposed race is not new and frankly, like pretty much everything race-related, has a long and insidious history. It’s known as racial-type photography and it was popularized in the late 19th century by white pseudo-scientists to “prove” the superiority of some races, and the inferiority of others. Anthropologists used photography to make anatomical comparisons, then racially classify and rank human subjects on an evolutionary scale “seeming to confirm that some peoples were less evolved than others and would therefore benefit from imperial control” (Picture Imperfect: Photography and Eugenics, 1879-1940 by Anne Maxwell, p.21). One of first scientists to use photography to record the anatomy of different races was Swiss-born zoologist and anthropologist Louis Agassiz who lived in America and in 1865 was the nation’s most celebrated naturalist. Agassiz, along with the help of portrait photographer Thomas Zealy, produced some of the earliest racial-type photographs of African slaves to appear in the US. He “wanted to see if the distinct traits of African-born slaves survived in American-born offspring. This would prove his theory that environmental factors wrought very few changes to the type, which by and large remained stable over time.” He staked his whole scientific career on the belief that the different races were created separately by God and in accordance with a divine, preordained plan (Maxwell, pp.23-24):

Enslaved Woman

(1850) photograph of an enslaved woman in South Carolina by Thomas Zealy for Louis Agassiz

Other influential examples of racial-type photography include: those produced by “British anthropologists Thomas Henry Huxley and John Lanprey [who] developed guidelines for the anthropometrical photographing of native subjects” (Maxell, p.29), those produced in 1871 Germany by the Berlin Society for Anthropology, Ethnology and Prehistory which “set out to assemble anthropological images from around the world, with the eventual purpose of disseminating these to scientific institutions in Germany and Britain” (Maxwell, p.39), and those by Australian photographer Paul Foelsche, “among the best examples of photographs of colonized peoples taken under oppressive conditions” (Maxwell, p.35):

Foelsche

(1870) untitled portrait by Paul Foelsche

Of course the overt, blatant racism in this older practice of racial-type photography would not be acceptable today. But has the practice of “photographing race” then gone away completely? Has our need to scan and declare the racial appearance of others for the purpose of valuation diminished? Apparently not. We’ve now got National Geographic’s 2013 endeavor (photographed by a white man through a racialized lens no less). We also have Time Magazine’s infamous 1993 cover “The New Face of America: How Immigrants Are Shaping the World’s First Multicultural Society” which was the computer generated face of a mixed-race woman created by merging people from various racial/ethnic backgrounds and who I have read her creators subsequently sort of fell in love with Pygmalion-style:


(1993) Time Magazine cover, “The New Face of America”

And we have Kip Fulbeck’s 2001 photo project of over 1200 volunteer subjects who self-identified as “Hapa” meant to promote awareness, recognition and give voice to the millions of multiracial/multiethnic individuals of Asian and Pacific Islander descent. Though Kip Fulbeck is aware of racial-type photographic history and acknowledges/challenges it in his book Half Asian 100% Hapa some feel his attempt to stand old forms on their heads, doesn’t work. He himself is a person of mixed-race Asian descent and certainly being a person of color behind the camera lends credence to the idea of reclamation and redefinition. Nevertheless at the end of the day, we are still left with a collection of photographs meant to capture race in some formation.

.

Apparently now we are comfortable shifting the practice of race-scanning and many of its same foundational values onto the ambiguous appearance of “different” looking people. Racism is incredibly adaptive and morphs to fit the times. I suggest that while modern race-photography believes itself to be celebrating the dismantling of race, it may actually be fooling us (and itself) with a fantastically complicated show of smoke and mirrors. What a critical mixed race view can offer at this juncture is something so crucial. We need to continually challenge and examine our desire to racially file people. We need to lift our eyes from the ground and take off the rose-colored glasses. We need to put away the headphones, turn off the music and turn on our ears. We need to make much, MUCH more space for something ultimately pretty simple — the stories of actual people themselves which in the end, will paint the real picture.

~ Guest blogger Sharon Chang writes at the blog MultiAsian Families.

(Source: rezprojectresources)

chsamuseum:

These are the Forbidden City Glamour Girls. Quite stunning, aren’t they?
Back in the 1930s and 40s, Chinatown nightclubs flourished. These girls were from Charlie Low’s legendary nightclub “Forbidden City.” Opened in 1938, Low named it after the Forbidden City in Beijing and served as the master of ceremonies. At its peak, the club drew hundreds of locals, Hollywood celebrities, and GIs. Forbidden City also put on comedy skits and music shows featuring an all Asian cast of singers, dancers, and vaudeville performers during a time when Asian Americans could not find employment in the entertainment business due to discriminatory laws and hiring practices.
For further reading: Arthur Dong “Forbidden City, USA: Chinese American Nightclubs, 1936-1970
If you’re in San Francisco, the CHSA Museum has a full day of programs this Saturday April 12. Arthur Dong will talk about his book over some cocktails!

chsamuseum:

These are the Forbidden City Glamour Girls. Quite stunning, aren’t they?

Back in the 1930s and 40s, Chinatown nightclubs flourished. These girls were from Charlie Low’s legendary nightclub “Forbidden City.” Opened in 1938, Low named it after the Forbidden City in Beijing and served as the master of ceremonies. At its peak, the club drew hundreds of locals, Hollywood celebrities, and GIs. Forbidden City also put on comedy skits and music shows featuring an all Asian cast of singers, dancers, and vaudeville performers during a time when Asian Americans could not find employment in the entertainment business due to discriminatory laws and hiring practices.

For further reading: Arthur Dong “Forbidden City, USA: Chinese American Nightclubs, 1936-1970

If you’re in San Francisco, the CHSA Museum has a full day of programs this Saturday April 12. Arthur Dong will talk about his book over some cocktails!

chsamuseum asked: Hello! We're the Chinese Historical Society of America, a nonprofit historical organization and museum based in San Francisco. We started following your page (it is a great tumblr btw) awhile back, we were wondering if you could look at ours. It's full of Asians not studying, breaking ground and just being generally awesome.

:) Yey!

mytongueisforked:

moriarty:

fucknofetishization:

"Shit white guys say to Asian girls"

other stupid, creeper shit white men say to asian girls:

"hey, i’m the most powerful, financially able and respected race in the united states. of course your cute little ass wants to date me!"

"i can make your life so much more successful. i can give you anything you want in life. because i’m white."

"god, i LOVE asian culture. you know why asian women are just so treasurable? it’s the cute, docile way you guys behave. white girls and black girls are getting annoying because they speak their mind and have independent attitudes. i feel like i’m being tossed around. but no. you. asians. youre just dying to serve, arent you? its in your culture to be submissive. its sO HOT."

"why would you be with a wimpy, skinny asian guy with a chopstick dick when you CAN BE WITH ME, MIGHTY DONG."

"i can get you that citizenship, baby. i know you want it."

YOU GUYS ARE SO FUCKING DISGUSTING I WANT TO SHOVE MY CHOPSTICKS INTO YOUR PISSHOLE UNTIL IT GOES UP THE ENTIRE LENGTH OF YOUR DICK THEN ILL SNAP IT IN HALF

i feel like us asian femmes should get together and form an asian fetishist revenge crew. white men are so fucking entitled and get so defensive when you bring up asian fetishism. like do you have any idea how fucking scary it can be to be hit on by white men? all the histories of violence, colonialism, and dehumanization. like i swear to god i will never date another white man. i cannot shake the weight of the history and the context surrounding white men -  asian women relationships. i feel it all over my body. 

asianamericanfilmlab:

http://caamedia.org/blog/2014/04/09/forbidden-city-chinatown-nightclubs-exhibit-in-sf/
“Forbidden City” Chinatown Nightclubs Exhibit Opens in SF
koreanmodel:

Park Sungjin for Harper’s Bazaar Men Thailand Spring / Summer 2014 by Natth Jaturapahu

koreanmodel:

Park Sungjin for Harper’s Bazaar Men Thailand Spring / Summer 2014 by Natth Jaturapahu

vintageindianclothing:

Two Women, 1930. Pic 1, sari worn nivi style, Pic 2, sari worn Gujarat/Parsi style. Brooch in both pictures, you can see a much simpler blouse style too as compared to previous decades.  And the jewelled headband of pic 1 which is also seen in the 1920s/1930s.

There are a number of photomontages taken by Wilson Studio, Bombay in the 1920s and 1930s (sometimes the saris seem similar, see Parsi gara of pic 2 and here)

International Women’s Health and Human Rights

Hello! I’m a TA for a free online class from Stanford University on International Health and Human Rights. The course focuses on critical issues, namely those that may mean life or death to a woman, depending on whether she can exercise her human rights. These critical issues include: being born female and discrimination; poverty; unequal access to education, food, paid work and health care; and various forms of violence. Topics discussed include son preference, education, HIV/AIDS, reproductive health, violence in the home and in war and refugee circumstances, women’s work, sex trafficking, and aging. The course also hopes to create an international network of engaged students. It would greatly benefit from the participation of you and your followers. Learn with us! Class starts Friday.

Hoping for a signal boost, but if you don’t feel that this is relevant to your blog or your followers, I apologize and please ignore! Thank you!

In the middle of a French exam, Charlie has other things on his mind. Written by and starring 17 year old Kim Ho from Sydney, this short film is ‘amazing’, according to Ellen DeGeneres.

Kim Coco Iwamoto, i worship you

samissodeep:

image

"I’m a strong proponent of investing in ‘change, not charity.’
Supporting programs that decrease oppression and exploitation by increasing literacy, creativity, sustainability, and democracy offers an extremely high return on investment for our community.”

- fourth-generation Japanese American

- identifies as transgender 

- worked with queer homeless youth in New York

- licensed therapeutic foster parent

- Hawaii Board of Education member since 2006

- civil rights attorney

- lives in a dopeass home designed to decrease ecological footprint

KIM + HELEN + RIHANNA = ME IN FIVE YEARS

(via saotome-michi)

Tags: badass lgbtq