halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 
The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.
Read more via The New York Times.

halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 

The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.

Read more via The New York Times.

(via thisiswhiteprivilege)

Tags: china feminism

Pamiri girls in Dushanbe. Tajikistan. (x)

(Source: marakanda, via everythingcentralasia)

halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 
The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.
Read more via The New York Times.

halftheskymovement:

A feminist group based in Guangzhou, China staged an online protest against the sexual exploitation of women in the workplace, revealing a photograph with a message boldly written in red on a whiteboard behind them: “My vagina does not come free with my labor.” More words were written on the women’s thighs, reiterating: “Not freebies.” 

The campaign was in response to a recent fatal rape case involving a 20-year-old woman at a state-owned company who was asked by her boss to a dinner. She was sexually assaulted by her boss’s friend and died as a result of her injuries.“Don’t ask your staff to provide part-time escort services. Women should only be asked to provide knowledge or technical skills in the workplace, but not other things,” says Ye Haiyan, an advocate of women’s and children’s rights.

Read more via The New York Times.

(via asianwomenbodyrainbow)

lastuli:

Illustrated poetry: ‘Oh rascal children of Gaza’

Rafah-born author and poet Khaled Juma wrote a heartbreaking tribute to the children of the Gaza Strip amidst the missiles striking his hometown. At least 506 Palestinian children have been killed since Israel commenced its latest invasion of Gaza on July 8, 2014

Photograph #1: A Palestinian boy, who fled with his family from their home during Israeli air strikes, bathes his brother at a United Nations-run school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 31, 2014. The school is a designated shelter for Palestinians who were displaced by Israel’s offensive. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #2: A Palestinian girl reacts at the scene of an explosion carried out by the Israeli military that killed at least eight children and wounded 40 more in a public garden in Gaza City on July 28, 2014. Photo credit: Finbarr O’Reilly

Photograph #3: A traumatized Palestinian child is comforted by a man arranging care for him in a hospital in Gaza City following an Israeli air strike on July 9, 2014. Photo credit: Momen Faiz

Photograph #4: A Palestinian child pulls out toys from a box at a local market in Gaza City during a temporary ceasefire on August 6, 2014. Palestinian and Israeli delegations met in Cairo with Hamas demanding an end to the siege on Gaza and Israel demanding a demilitarization of the territory. Photo credit: Lefteris Pitarakis

Photograph #5: A Palestinian boy sleeps at a United Nations-run school in Gaza City on July 14, 2014, after fleeing with his family from their home in Beit Lahya. Photo credit: Mohammed Salem

Photograph #6: Doctors tend to injured children while a young girl sitting on her mother’s lap cries at a hospital in Rafah in the southern Gaza Strip on August 4, 2014. Photo credit: Eyad El Baba

Photograph #7: A Palestinian girl cries while being treated at a hospital in Beit Lahya following after sustaining injuries from an Israeli air strike on a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp on July 30, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #8: Two Palestinians girls celebrate the first day of Eid Al-Fitr on the grounds of a United Nations school in the Jabalya Refugee Camp in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Their families are among the dozens that have fled their homes and sought refuge in the school. Normally, Muslim families in Palestine celebrate Eid Al-Fitr by visiting one another and gifting children with new clothes and shoes. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

Photograph #9: One-and-a-half year old Razel Netzlream was killed after she was fatally hit by shrapnel from an Israeli air strike on an adjacent home the previous day. Her father carries her body to the funeral in Khan Younis on July 18, 2014. Photo credit: Alessio Romenzi

Photograph 10: A portrait of Shahed Quishta, 8, is fixed to a pillar in her home in Beit Lahya on August 16, 2014, after an Israeli tank fired a shell into the living room. She was killed on July 22, 2014. Photo credit: Khalil Hamra

(via allahyil3analsohyouniyeh)

cody-the-unicorn:

People often don’t realize how important preferred names and pronouns are to transgender people.

So that’s why we need to make them realize how big of a difference they make.

samjoonyuh:

Perspective. 

(via korraisnottan)

Tags: solidarity

everythingcentralasia:

Photos from the Holi Party vol. 02 in Dushanbe, Tajikistan. The festival was sponsored by “Alegria” and the restaurant “Delhi darbar”. It was dedicated to India’s Independence Day.

(via fuckyeahethnicwomen)

seokim:

a doodle comic

seokim:

a doodle comic

thisisnotchina:

xbeautiful-chaosx:

slaymonsters:

sunshineturds:

maakomori:

youre gonna make a biopic abt anna may wong, who left america because they werent offering her substantial roles who was passed over for playing a chinese woman in the good earth in favour of a yellowfaced katherine hepburn

but youre…

Feel free to correct me if im wrong, but your upset because because they cast a chinese woman instead of a chinese american?

I dont know…maybe its just me, but in my opinion thats about as bad as getting upset over casting a british person to play an american, or something of that nature.

Then again, maybe im just an uneducated fuckwit.

so i mean i’m glossing over a lot of anna may wong’s life here, but her entire career was full of disappointments because she was too “chinese” for hollywood and too “american” for china. she found fame in europe where they were fascinated by her chinese looks and american personality, both of which were “exotic” and glamorous to european audiences. she dedicated her later career to denouncing the negative views of chinese women in american culture. she’s become an icon and heroine to chinese and asian americans as a symbol of our specific histories of suffering in america. there’s a statue dedicated to her in hollywood. she’s a chinese american legend. her story is exactly one of the lack of opportunities afforded to asian american actors even still to this day. so yeah, not only is it fucking disappointing that an incredibly important chinese american figure is not being played by a chinese american, it’s also pretty hypocritical. you obviously have no fucking idea what anna may wong means to chinese america so please stop editorializing on something that has nothing to do with you.

-e

koreanmodel:

Min Joon Ki, Kim Hansu, Jang Kiyong, James Lee Mcquown and Park Jaegeun by Kim Youngjun for Arena Homme Korea June 2014

koreanmodel:

Min Joon Ki, Kim Hansu, Jang Kiyong, James Lee Mcquown and Park Jaegeun by Kim Youngjun for Arena Homme Korea June 2014

thebluelip-blondie:

this is happening in over 50 cities nationwide (and Canada)

themightyif:

livealiens:

#brownamericanproblems

I’ve reblogged this before, but it’s still got to be one of the more relatable image sets I’ve ever seen.

(Source: haringtonskits, via verolynne)

The Blonds SS12

(Source: michiko-malandro, via petitsirena)

radchaphruek said: Hi, I love your blog! I’m a mod at bookendeds. We’re a diverse media review blog focussing on books. Our aim is to bring media with themes and characters that are scarcely represented in mainstream media to your attention, as well as to give you an overall assessment of its progressiveness and quality. We’re new and could use some promotion. Would you mind publishing this ask for your followers to see?

Yey! Please follow!

Words That Burn

ibelieveyouitsnotyourfault:

By Lily Tsui

image

Dear ______,

My mother was/is awful:

“Why can’t you be like other girls, and care more about how you look? No man will ever want you,” she lamented, when I showed no interest in make-up.

“I will kill myself if you don’t do what I say,” she threatened, waving a kitchen knife around, in an argument about curfew.

"You need to talk to your father about not sleeping with other women. If you can’t stop him then he is going to get AIDS and then he will give it to me and then you will be an orphan," she said, when I was twelve.

“I will pay for surgery to get your nose and eyelids fixed,” she offered, even though I didn’t care about my mismatched eyes and my perfectly functional nose.

“You must go on the pill because I don’t trust you not to get ‘carried away’ and have sex,” she demanded, when I started dating, even though I had no intention of having sex at the time.

“Have you lost any weight?” she asked, each time she called on the phone in lieu of “hello.”

“Why don’t you quit school and take better care of your husband and your home?” she asked, after a lifetime of demanding academic achievement. 

“What did you do?” she asked accusingly, when I told her my marriage was ending.

“There is something wrong with your personality. You’re too much like your father.” she declared, to explain why my marriage ended.

“I had you because I thought it would make your father want to be at home more,” she said, as though that wasn’t selfish and incredibly hurtful.

“Doesn’t your husband/boyfriend/fiance mind if you travel without him?” she asked, and continues to ask.

During a severe bout of major depression after the end of my marriage, I decided I needed space from her toxicity, as she had reacted exactly as I predicted: she blamed me. First she asked if I was cheating. Then she asked if I had failed to “take care” of him and the household sufficiently. Then she asked if it was because he resented my education, my independence. Then she cried and made it all about her. This all happened within half an hour.

After a few days of this self-centred diatribe, I told her not to contact me until she heard otherwise. Instead of respecting my boundaries, she emailed and called relentlessly. When I didn’t reply or pick up the phone, she progressed to ask other members of my family that I was close to, some of whom lived overseas, to plead on her behalf. One by one they contacted me. One by one they heard my side of the story, and understood why I needed that space for my own well-being. Most of them apologized for getting involved. More than a year later, when I allowed her (cautiously), back in my life, she accused me of being cruel:

“How could you not speak to me for a year? How could you do that to your own mother?” she said, sobbing. In a Thai restaurant.

She never understood that her behaviour was/is problematic. She never accepted that her words, regardless of intent, were hurtful. From the time I was a teenager, right up to the present, she was and can still be abusive. 

Only through intensive psychotherapy did I realize how much of her toxicity I internalized. I blamed myself for things I had no control over. I felt guilty about everything, and whenever I managed to get the guilt got under control I would feel guilty that I didn’t feel guilty enough. I had to learn how to love myself without constantly using guilt and self-deception. I had to learn how to stop talking to myself abusively, inside my own head. I had to teach myself something everyone should know about themselves right from the beginning: that we are worthy of being treated with love and respect.

It didn’t help that the people I confided in rarely believed me. When I was younger, people would say, “all teenagers fight with their parents.” When I got older, people would say, “she just doesn’t know how to say ‘I love you.’” When she asked about my weight, people would say “she’s just concerned about your health.” Sometimes they would attribute her abuse to misunderstandings due to language (she is ESL, but so am I, and although it is not my primary language anymore I am still fluent in Cantonese). “It’s a generation/culture-gap,” people told me. “A mother would never hurt her child intentionally,” some said, especially those who were mothers themselves.

That was all bullshit. That’s people’s internalized ageism, fatphobia, racism, and idealized ideas about parenthood masquerading as explanations for my mother’s verbally-abusive behaviour. It’s straight up denial. Sexism and her perception that I should only exist for others (whether as a prop in her relationship with my father, or as a domestic worker for my partners) guided her words. I often wished she had hit me instead, because I figured it was harder for people to explain away a bruise or a cut. I want all those people who ever excused her behaviour to know that, even though they may have never spoken with her directly, that their words and excuses enabled her abuse, and that by not believing me they gave her more power to hurt me. They may have had the best of intentions, but my mother believes she has nothing but the best of intentions too.

Many people won’t believe you, when you tell them your mother’s words burn like fire and tear you to pieces and leave you scarred on the inside. But there are people out there who will believe you. I know, because I believe you. It’s not your fault. I know, because it wasn’t my fault either.

I BELIEVE YOU. IT’S NOT YOUR FAULT.

- Lily Tsui