Asians Not Studying

Oct 19

(via therealbluerayne)

clipout:

Kyoto, 1951 (photo by Werner Bischof)

clipout:

Kyoto, 1951 (photo by Werner Bischof)

secretdiaryofapashtungirl:

Mughal painting shows two Africans in a group sharing a light moment. It hints at a more open-minded Indian society.
When black was no bar: How Africans shaped India’s history

secretdiaryofapashtungirl:

Mughal painting shows two Africans in a group sharing a light moment. It hints at a more open-minded Indian society.

When black was no bar: How Africans shaped India’s history

(via fuckyeahsouthasia)

Oct 09

[video]

Oct 06

isaia:

Kalinga women performing the Langaya Dance.
Day 1 of Inktober, days 2-4 to come soon. (Along with everything else) Also it’s Filipino-American heritage month, why not both.jpg.

isaia:

Kalinga women performing the Langaya Dance.

Day 1 of Inktober, days 2-4 to come soon. (Along with everything else)
Also it’s Filipino-American heritage month, why not both.jpg.

(via pinoy-culture)

catedrals:

colorintheworksepichearts-7:

footybedsheets:

"40% of Afghanistan’s skateboarders are female.100 % of those are tough as nails. " Source: @Skateistan

now that’s kickass

THIS IS THE RADDEST PICTURE I’VE EVER SEEN ROCK THE FUCK ON

catedrals:

colorintheworksepichearts-7:

footybedsheets:

"40% of Afghanistan’s skateboarders are female.100 % of those are tough as nails. "
Source: @Skateistan

now that’s kickass

THIS IS THE RADDEST PICTURE I’VE EVER SEEN ROCK THE FUCK ON

(via korraisnottan)

jhameia:

paul-mclennon:

OH MY GOD

"Fries before guys" has been added to my list of life mottos now.

jhameia:

paul-mclennon:

OH MY GOD

"Fries before guys" has been added to my list of life mottos now.

(Source: across-the-ringoverse)

Oct 04

[video]

Oct 02

bang1adesh:

Brick Wicket by AvikBangalee on Flickr.

bang1adesh:

Brick Wicket by AvikBangalee on Flickr.

(via fyeahbangladesh)

koreanmodel:

Lee Seungmi by Ahn Jiseop for Voguegirl Korea Nov 2011

koreanmodel:

Lee Seungmi by Ahn Jiseop for Voguegirl Korea Nov 2011

[video]

http://the-wistful-collectivist.tumblr.com/post/98937865363/himteckerjam-owning-my-truth-erasure-is -

noirewallflower:

the-wistful-collectivist:

himteckerjam:

owning-my-truth:

Erasure is never and will never be solidarity, it is always a form of violence in its most raw form from supposed “allies” who love nothing more than to hack into black lives, bodies and experiences for their own ends as a movement.

This would make sense if the people in Hong Kong were actually doing the “Dont Shoot” but from what I read? They actually aren’t.

http://colorlines.com/archives/2014/09/hands_up_dont_shoot_in_hong_kong_protests.html

'Most Hong Kong protesters aren’t purposefully mimicking “hands up, don’t shoot,”as some have suggested. Instead, the gesture is a result of training and instructions from protest leaders, who have told demonstrators to raise their hands with palms forward to signal their peaceful intentions to police.

Asked about any link between the gesture and Ferguson, Icy Ng, a 22-year-old design student at Hong Kong Polytechnic University said, “I don’t think so. We have our hands up for showing both the police and media that we have no weapons in our hands.” Ng had not heard of the Ferguson protests. Another demonstrator, with the pro-democracy group Occupy Central, Ellie Ng said the gesture had nothing to do with Ferguson and is intended to demonstrate that “Hong Kong protesters are peaceful, unarmed, and mild.” 

http://colorlines.com/archives/2014/09/hands_up_dont_shoot_in_hong_kong_protests.html

LOLOLOL ok this whole rant is mute

This is what I thought. I swear I’m tired of people in their need to be extra. 

Oct 01

McGill #OccupyCentral Rally Speech

Check out this great speech from No One is Illegal member, Vincent Tao!
hk rally speech 02/10/14

for those who requested i put this up, here’s my speech from today’s demo in solidarity w/ hong kong

feel free to use it/circulate it as you like

for some info on the “live-in rule” and the “2 week rule”:

http://hkhelperscampaign.com/en/scrap-the-2-week-rule/

• • •

Hey everyone, my name is Vincent Tao and I’m a member of No One Is Illegal Montreal. 

I believe it should be our priority here to stand against the state’s brazen use of violent police force in response to this Monday’s protests in Hong Kong’s downtown core. While the HKP’s most recent display of state-sanctioned brutality is plainly appalling and should be condemned internationally, it is anything but “surprising” in this day and age — sadly, we have come to expect that when the people take to the streets and attempt to exercise their right to occupy public space in any given global financial hub, they will inevitably be met with the blunt end of a cop’s nightstick. From Montreal to Hong Kong, police forces around the world are charging ahead in a one-sided arms race with the people — while we pick up umbrellas and bottles, cops are brandishing bigger and better implements of war every day. So whether a protestor decides to break a window or pick up their garbage, we must denounce police brutality in any place and in any form — all police brutality is excessive. 

I am the son of Hong Kongers — [I am a Hong Konger] — so I cannot begin to describe the complicated feelings of longing and belonging I felt when I first saw the images of Victoria Square filled with people my age marching for what they believe in. But when the deluge of Western media reports came pouring in, the message communicated in these images of people power became at once terribly distorted and painfully clear. From the Times to the Economist, Western media outlets are obsessed with the imagination of a “famously orderly” and clean Hong Kong, a postcard image of the prosperous global financial centre painted with a nostalgia for the city’s time under British colonial rule. At the same time that press releases recycle the age-old language of ‘yellow peril’, that ever-looming threat of an always backwards and fundamentally undemocratic China, reporters seek to perpetuate stereotypes of Occupy Central protesters as ‘model minorities’, an image strategically mobilized to shame the anti-authoritarian actions of our black and brown brothers and sisters in Ferguson and abroad. 

So contrary to the notion that this is the first time in Hong Kong’s history that the “people are coordinating themselves with little direction from the government or institutions,” and with an exceptional air of middle-class decorum at that at that, we must be reminded that in May of 1967, the youth of my father’s generation set off bombs in the fight for decent working conditions and social planning initiatives from Hong Kong’s negligent colonial administration. 

What must not be erased here is the long history of labour organizing, grass-roots mobilization, and protest in Hong Kong. But more importantly, I fear what else may be erased in our hasty celebration of the pro-democracy moment is the actual content of ‘democracy’. What is obscured in the flood of Getty images of youthful students peacefully marching in the streets is the fact that Hong Kong’s population of 7 million are not all bright-eyed MBA prospects and would-be hedge fund managers. In the reports of the protest streaming in as I speak, why is there no mention of the appalling income gap in Hong Kong, of how one in five of the island’s population are below the poverty line, of how suicide rates in the city’s poorer neighbourhoods are 3.5 times higher than they are in the adjacent financial districts? When the world measures Hong Kong’s so-called prosperity by its skyrocketing property prices, it is a sad inevitability that Occupy Central’s televised cry for democracy makes no mention of demands for public housing. 

So let me ask you — just who is this ‘democracy’ for? Will universal suffrage be extended to the foreign domestic workers from Indonesia, the Phillipines, Nepal, Thailand, and Bangladesh that make up 10% of the island’s work force? When Leung Chun-ying is ousted as the city’s Chief Executive, will there be an end to Hong Kong’s “live-in rule” and “2 week rule” that force migrant women into a form of state-approved slavery? When Hong Kong achieves ’true democracy’, will there be justice for Erwania, the 23 year-old live-in domestic worker who was just one year ago found to be kept in a cage and tortured by her employers? When migrant workers must keep silence in the face of overwhelming rates of verbal, physical, and sexual abuse from the employers they must live with for fear of near-immediate deportation, how can we begin to talk about democracy? 

So I urge you to ask yourselves, what is at stake in Hong Kong’s so-called pro-democracy movement, and just who does Occupy Central represent? Does universal suffrage for Hong Kong just mean universal suffrage for middle-class ‘Hong Kong Chinese’? It is my belief that democracy is bankrupt without justice and dignity for all peoples. 


Thank you.

October is Filipino American Heritage Month

racismschool:

Happy Filipino American Heritage Month Everyone!

(via pinoy-culture)

[video]