Typecast (Lorde “Royals” Parody)
Written and performed by Tess Paras
(feat. Haneefah Wood and Ayana Hampton)
Directed by Rebekka Johnson
Music produced by Jack Dolgen

(Source: knitmeapony)

isatv:

Proud to welcome one of the most influential blogs in the Asian American community, @AngryAsianMan to ISAtv! Hes joined by @wongfuphil @jennyyangtv @Disgrasian to discuss culture and news in the Asian American community. Watch now Youtube.com/ISAtv

isatv:

Proud to welcome one of the most influential blogs in the Asian American community, @AngryAsianMan to ISAtv! Hes joined by @wongfuphil @jennyyangtv @Disgrasian to discuss culture and news in the Asian American community. Watch now Youtube.com/ISAtv

labrujamorgan:

navigatethestream:

mytongueisforked:

i know there are disclaimers.

but we should never take what it means to be a community for granted.

i feel like people throw the word “community” around without thought as to how we build it, the work that goes into it,…

So you wish you were Asian.

harmonykilledthehonk:

My parents came to the United States with a suitcase filled with things from their previous lives. They worked two jobs, seven days a week, while studying as full-time students to complete their education. My dad tells me stories about how he waited tables late into the night, while my mom sold shoes at flea markets on her days off to earn spare  cash to buy a car. They built the privilege affirmative action says we have from nothing but hard work.

I was given the gift of being able to be born into a family that defined the American Dream. My parents taught me English and Chinese simultaneously, spent hours reading me stories of Snow White and Cinderella, and the Monkey adventures in Journey to the West. It wasn’t until much later that I realized that they had learned English from memorizing vocabulary cards and reading old textbooks on grammar.

And though my parents taught me English, they ask me to deal with scheduling doctor appointments for them; they ask me to proofread emails for them, out of embarrassment that they feel their English isn’t sufficient to be taken seriously, it sickens me when I realize that while their mastery of the English language is more than proficient, it doesn’t matter, because the rest of the world doesn’t care.

But you wish you were Asian.

I grew up, hearing the words of boys whose only “standard” for the girls they were interested in was “Asian,” realizing that the disgustingly scary fetish of Asian women is actually a reality. I grew up, watching the world’s understanding of my cultural heritage be reduced to ching chong’s and ling long’s, kimonos, and fortune cookies. I grew up, being asked if my parents belonged to the communist party, when I held in me the stories they told me of labor camps they were sent to at the age of 13, of how one day, they couldn’t go to school anymore, of how my grandparents tried desperately later on, long after Mao’s regime ended, to force their children, now adults, to eat copious amounts of food, as if to make up for times when there was nothing to eat.

But you want to be Asian. 

I live in a country that has yet to realize that yellow face is not appropriate on mainstream television, a world that somehow doesn’t realize that statements like, “Kill the Chinese!!” are not acceptable to be aired on talk shows. I live in the 21st century, where the only understanding I can get about the story behind my heritage comes from my own parents, where the only times I can see people who look like me on screen is on Youtube.

I grew up as an Asian American, an individual in a group of people that never really belonged anywhere. Because in the United States, we’re nothing more than descendants of the people who invented orange chicken, and in China, we’re foreigners who fail to adopt the careful nuance of the dialect spoken there. We grew up, holding our ethnicity as something of great pride, and at the same time, of great burden. 

Our representation in the United States government practically is nonexistent. There is no proof that we as a group of human beings existed beyond the pages of Amy Tan novels. The caricatures on television taught us that we were nerds, deficient at English and social skills, bound by our supposed tiger parents to live out their dreams.

And because we apparently don’t exist to the rest of the United States, the inherent racism my “fascinating” ethnicity faces also ceases to exist.

But still. You enjoy your green tea and kungfu movies and paper lanterns. You love your Chinese 1 class and your Japanese Civilizations course and Wang Leehom. And my goodness, what you would give, if only you could be Asian.

(via weareallmixedup)

thisisnotpinoy:

animewhenwet:

thisisnotpinoy:

The hierarchy of the Philippines during Spanish colonization was based on nationality (place of birth), ethnicity, and racial mixing. Pure Spanish or Chinese blood did not guarantee one the highest of class, so even these ethnicities may have found that having mestizo children would be better.
It is interesting to note the following:
A mestizo of 1/2 Native American (Indio Americano) descent was valued higher than a mestizo of 1/2 Philippine Indio descent. This may have influenced the modern practice of Filipinos denying their Asian heritage in favor of their Hispanic heritage (whether real or imagined). This also is the source of resentment of Filipinos in the US—especially California—for people of Mexican heritage (Note: also part of the reason for this is Spain’s rule over the Philippines was through administration by the viceroyalty of Mexico).
There was a distinction made between Negritos and the rest of the Indio Filipino population. This probably is what has led to today’s discrimination of Negrito and African-American/Filipino individuals.
Even if one was full Spanish, having the nationality of Filipino put one lower than Spaniards born in Spain or the Americas and mestizos of American Indios. Perhaps this is part of the reason for the distinction between Fil-Ams and “FOBs” (in the US) as well as Kanos (here used to refer to Filipinos born in the States, Guam, or Saipan but living in the Philippines) and native Filipinos (born in raised in the Philippines)
A full blooded Chinese person was put above a full blooded indio, a half Chinese/Filipino person below a Spaniard/Filipino person, and a mix of all three ethnicities higher than a Spaniard/Filipino person. This has led to the resentment of Tsinoys (today’s Chinese Filipinos) by ethnic Filipinos without the same “mestiso worship” enjoyed by people who are of Eurasian descent.
The amount of Insulares was probably less than that of Peninsulares because less women migrated to the Philippines than men from Spain. For the men who migrated to the Philippines, they were more likely to be from the Americas than from Spain.
The information is not reflective of other ethnicities that were in the Philippines at the time such as African, Indian, or Japanese. Some further questions for this information may include: Was there a distinction made between Africans and Negritos? What was the difference, if any, in the caste of a Japanese/Filipino Mestizo or an Indian/Filipino and a Chinese/Filipino Mestizo? Were there indio ethnicities that were treated higher than other indio ethnicities (Ilocano vs Kapampangan; Visayan vs Bikolano)? Were mestizos of American, non-Mexican heritage placed lower than mestizos associated with Mexico?

Yo does that make me a mestizo de sangley because I was born in the Philippines with a filipina mom and a Singaporean dadIs that what I am

These terms are from colonial Philippine history.A lot of the terms are outdated. The terms that are used, like Americano and Negrito, have changed in meaning. Americano often means Black or white Americans, and Negrito doesn’t just mean Aeta anymore (need to fix that part of the graphic). You might identify as Filipin@ and Singaporean. You can identify as whatever you think identifies you the best. :)

thisisnotpinoy:

animewhenwet:

thisisnotpinoy:

The hierarchy of the Philippines during Spanish colonization was based on nationality (place of birth), ethnicity, and racial mixing. Pure Spanish or Chinese blood did not guarantee one the highest of class, so even these ethnicities may have found that having mestizo children would be better.

It is interesting to note the following:

  • A mestizo of 1/2 Native American (Indio Americano) descent was valued higher than a mestizo of 1/2 Philippine Indio descent. This may have influenced the modern practice of Filipinos denying their Asian heritage in favor of their Hispanic heritage (whether real or imagined). This also is the source of resentment of Filipinos in the US—especially California—for people of Mexican heritage (Note: also part of the reason for this is Spain’s rule over the Philippines was through administration by the viceroyalty of Mexico).
  • There was a distinction made between Negritos and the rest of the Indio Filipino population. This probably is what has led to today’s discrimination of Negrito and African-American/Filipino individuals.
  • Even if one was full Spanish, having the nationality of Filipino put one lower than Spaniards born in Spain or the Americas and mestizos of American Indios. Perhaps this is part of the reason for the distinction between Fil-Ams and “FOBs” (in the US) as well as Kanos (here used to refer to Filipinos born in the States, Guam, or Saipan but living in the Philippines) and native Filipinos (born in raised in the Philippines)
  • A full blooded Chinese person was put above a full blooded indio, a half Chinese/Filipino person below a Spaniard/Filipino person, and a mix of all three ethnicities higher than a Spaniard/Filipino person. This has led to the resentment of Tsinoys (today’s Chinese Filipinos) by ethnic Filipinos without the same “mestiso worship” enjoyed by people who are of Eurasian descent.
  • The amount of Insulares was probably less than that of Peninsulares because less women migrated to the Philippines than men from Spain. For the men who migrated to the Philippines, they were more likely to be from the Americas than from Spain.

The information is not reflective of other ethnicities that were in the Philippines at the time such as African, Indian, or Japanese. Some further questions for this information may include: Was there a distinction made between Africans and Negritos? What was the difference, if any, in the caste of a Japanese/Filipino Mestizo or an Indian/Filipino and a Chinese/Filipino Mestizo? Were there indio ethnicities that were treated higher than other indio ethnicities (Ilocano vs Kapampangan; Visayan vs Bikolano)? Were mestizos of American, non-Mexican heritage placed lower than mestizos associated with Mexico?

Yo does that make me a mestizo de sangley because I was born in the Philippines with a filipina mom and a Singaporean dad
Is that what I am

These terms are from colonial Philippine history.A lot of the terms are outdated. The terms that are used, like Americano and Negrito, have changed in meaning. Americano often means Black or white Americans, and Negrito doesn’t just mean Aeta anymore (need to fix that part of the graphic). You might identify as Filipin@ and Singaporean. You can identify as whatever you think identifies you the best. :)

meluvsxiumin asked: Hello there, Gunnarolla. I was just wondering, what kind of shampoo do you use? Your hair is FLAWLESS!

gunnarolla:

Thanks! I use Tresemme Deep Cleanse. It’s like, the most shampoo for the cheapest price. 

Any time that I’ve had good hair it’s thanks to my hairstylist (I’ve been going to the same one for a couple years, I think that’s important). 

Any time I have bad hair (most of the time), it’s because I haven’t had time to go to the hairstylist. Exhibit A:

koreanmodel:

Lee Hyunyi for Vogue Korea Dec 2013

koreanmodel:

Lee Hyunyi for Vogue Korea Dec 2013

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Li Xiaofeng 

Porcelain fragments from the ming and qing dynasties, 2006-2008

Li Xiaofeng is a Beijing artist who creates clothing piece made from traditional chinese ceramics. He makes the clothing from ceramic shards coming from the song, ming, yuan and qing dynasties, which are sewn together on a leather undergarment. Some of his projects include
a suit jacket and tie as well as a number of mid-length women’s dresses. In Xiaofeng’s studio, piles of ceramic pieces sit in bins sorted by date, colour and shape. ‘save as: contemporary chinese art born of ancient traditions’ currently running at the virginia miller gallery is his
exhibition debut outside of asia. The show runs until february 28, 2009.

http://www.virginiamiller.com/artists/LiXiaofeng/LiXiaofeng.html
http://www.designboom.com/art/li-xiaofeng/
http://www.odditycentral.com/pics/the-amazing-porcelain-costumes-of-li-xiaofeng.html

(via saotome-michi)

Tags: art

Source

For more of this confident cutie: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram | Vine

(Source: prismcess, via petitsirena)

Tags: fashion family

Harper’s Bazaar Thailand December 2012
New Frontier
Photographer: Nat Prakobsantisuk
Fashion Director: Chamnan Pakdeesuk
Models: Chutimon ‘Aokbab’ Jugchareonsukying, Nitiporn ‘Pat’ Lertnitiwongsakul, Time Charoenthaitawee, Baiboon ‘Jan’ Arunpreechachai and Francis Lane

Harper’s Bazaar Thailand December 2012
New Frontier

Photographer: Nat Prakobsantisuk
Fashion Director: Chamnan Pakdeesuk
Models: Chutimon ‘Aokbab’ Jugchareonsukying, Nitiporn ‘Pat’ Lertnitiwongsakul, Time Charoenthaitawee, Baiboon ‘Jan’ Arunpreechachai and Francis Lane

(Source: enesidaeon, via herocountry)

Tags: art

stuffhappening:

all autocompletes were screenshots of actual searches on 12/3/2013

photo credit: Mike Allen

This Photoshoot

The idea was inspired by the UN Women campaign by Memac Ogilvy & Mather Dubai. 

Racism from Absence

In my 19 years in America, I’ve never been stopped and frisked. Cops are always nice to me. People have no problems sitting next to me on the bus. No one’s scared of me no matter what direction I pointed my cap. 

The kind of Asian racism that makes headlines is cultural misappropriation -when some “insensitive” entertainer wears silk kimonos and painted faces to look exotic.

This never bothered me.

It’s the subtle, slippery racism that’s far more sinister. The absence of Asian leads in a non-martial arts movie or TV shows means I grew up knowing only non-Asian celebrities and role models. And if you’re an Asian guy, you are not the stuff of fantasies girls grew up dreaming about.

The absence of Asians from politics and upper management means that Asians can be hard workers and geniuses but never leaders.

Above all, there seems to be some perma-foreignness about Asians. It’s not unusual to be told to “go back to China” and to be mocked for an accent we don’t have. The manifestations of this viewpoint range from the seemingly harmless to the outright hostile. But the underlying message is the same. Asians are not real Americans.

Inspirational Racism

I vividly remember seeing this racism first-hand in a conversation with one of my former business partners. I wanted to create a mentoring program in a predominantly Asian school organization.

He flat out told me he had no interest in helping Asians succeed in America. I asked him, “Are you serious?” He said, “Yeah.” He laughed a little.

He was serious.

It was a wtf moment for many reasons and was a major factor behind my decision to leave my position as a co-founder. I eventually heard from a mutual friend that he said I was a follower not a leader.

In retrospect, I’m fortunate to have heard him verbalize something that others keep to themselves. It allowed me to move on to bigger and better things instead of wasting time working with someone who never saw me as a partner. 

Confessions of an ABC Banana Twinky

I’ve been uncomfortable being Asian since the 2nd grade. Back then I was the foreign kid who didn’t speak any English who became the butt of every joke.

This bullying motivated me to learn English fast. By 3rd grade, I was nearly fluent and huge chunk of my vocabulary were insults and comebacks.

In 4th grade I started seeing my race as a handicap. I thought the only way to be accepted is to break every Asian stereotype. As a result, I avoided the other Asian kids. I stopped caring about my grades. Then there was the denial. For a period of my life I was Chinese Clayton Bigsby. I actually felt like I was white. 

In the 6th grade one of my friends picked a fight with me for no reason and told me to go back to China. In retrospect, I shouldn’t have taken it so hard. But I did. I couldn’t look past the fact he was just some 12-year old taking medication for hyperactive aggression. At the time I felt the full weight of my racial identity and caused me to stray further away.

—-

When I moved to a better school district in the 8th grade, a lot of the overt forms of bullying disappeared. Despite this, I still scoffed at Asian cliques and was embarrassed to speak Chinese in public or do anything which reminded people of who I really was. 

The only time I referenced my race was through self-deprecating humor. 

—-

In college, I became “ok” with being Asian. I didn’t feel embarrassed to speak Chinese in public anymore. I also started to see some value in Asian culture and re-developed interest in the history.

I was also in a serious relationship with someone who accepted me fully. I also joined a business fraternity that was predominantly Asian.

I took a lot of steps in the right direction, but I still felt divided. It wasn’t until  my second time meditating with a Shaman that I finally confronted the self-loathing I built up through the years. 

—-

I learned that by acting opposite to my stereotypes, I’m still letting ignorance control my life. Instead, the only thing that matters is figuring out who I want to be, and seeing if my actions are consistent with that version of myself.

The challenge is being honest with myself and admitting when my actions come from a place of insecurity and defensiveness. Committing to change that behavior is one of the purest expression of “self” stripped of delusion and denial.

—-

Note: I’m just a guy with a Finance background who rescues cats and makes videos. I’ve never had diversity and sensitivity training. I just know my own experience and how it shaped the way I think today.

But, I do hope some parts of this resonates. 

If you have any comments, agreements, or disagreements please drop me a line via the confirm/deny link on the upper left corner. I’m also reachable by email here. Or tweet @stevesdrop. 

Tags: art racism

harikondabolu:

White people will be the minority in 2042…AND I DON’T GIVE A SHIT.

policymic:

henrycavills:

this girl literally destroys all other covers of let it go and she does it sitting down

The singer’s full name is Son Seung Yeon and she’s currently studying at Berklee School of Music in Boston. From the sound of this cover, it looks like her career is about to take off. She manages the twists and turns of the powerful ballad with an uncanny ease. Idina Menzel has some steep competition in Sonnet’s range and expressive vocal styling. 

Read more

Follow policymic

(via racialicious)

Tags: music badass